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Medical Health

Summer 2021

What’s up? Doctors.

The Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine launches its first class of physicians to fulfill the mission of bringing health care to rural and underserved communities.

This inaugural class of WSU physicians has 21.4 percent who grew up in a rural county and 18 percent notably in a Washington rural county + 18 percent are first-generation college graduates + 55.4 percent come from a low socioeconomic background + 18 Washington counties represented: Benton, Chelan, Clallam, Clark, Cowlitz, Franklin, Grant, King, Kittitas, Pacific, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane, Stevens, Thurston, Whatcom, Whitman, and Yakima.
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Most people studying to be a medical doctor have those moments. … » More …

Coronavirus illustration
Fall 2020

COVID-19 research at WSU

As the COVID-19 pandemic hit, many Washington State University researchers refocused their efforts on the disease and its impacts.

Below are some of the research projects underway. It’s a dynamic list, so check back with WSU News for more projects.

 

COVID-19 crisis shows need for long-term changes
The upheaval created by the coronavirus 2019 outbreak, or COVID-19, is already transforming our society. Some of those changes may need to last a while to get through this and future outbreaks, according to Washington State University infectious disease epidemiologist Eric Lofgren.

WSU researchers … » More …

Spring 2020

Cannabis in WA state

The legalization of recreational cannabis in Washington state and Colorado in 2012 opened a box full of questions and debates about the drug and its related crop, hemp.

What is the effect on youth? Will crime go up? How does cannabis interact with other drugs and medicines? What health claims are accurate? How does the potency of cannabis affect mental health? These gaps, and many others, in our knowledge—combined with unverified claims by both proponents and opponents of legalized cannabis—make it difficult to find the best ways to regulate and manage the substance.

To answer the call, almost 100 Washington State University researchers have begun … » More …

Spring 2019

Medical Big Data

Big data is a powerful new tool in the medical bag, and one that can put patients in charge of their own health. Medical students at Washington State University are learning about the potential use of the tool on medical teams, while a new data analytics program at WSU teaches future data analysts. » More ...
Winter 2017

Medical leaders keep a community-based focus

Helping guide WSU’s community-based medical education are associate deans assigned to each of the regional hubs where students will spend their third and fourth years working alongside practicing physicians and others.

All are recognized innovators in medical education and were hired by WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine following a nationwide search.

They are Dr. Larry Schecter at WSU Everett, Dr. Kevin Murray at WSU Vancouver and Dr. Farion Williams at WSU Tri-Cities.

“These associate deans will teach, recruit faculty to teach, and further the college mission by building out clinical partnerships with the rural and underserved areas,” said Ken … » More …

Winter 2017

Reconsidering health

Ancient Greek physician Hippocrates proposed that four basic personalities were driven by excess or lack of bodily fluids, the “humors.” Discredited by biochemistry, we may consider the idea humorous, but Hippocrates’ theories began a centuries-long consideration of temperaments and personality in psychology and philosophy.

Other ideas of human health were first spurned and then accepted. Germ theory, the thought that many diseases are caused by microorganisms, was treated with disdain when it was proposed in the sixteenth century. It didn’t receive its due until nineteenth-century experiments by cholera researcher John Snow and chemist Louis Pasteur, among others, proved germ theory’s validity.

Even today we continue … » More …