Skip to main content Skip to navigation

Business

Bell in hotel lobby
Fall 2020

Generations of hospitality

Four decades of hospitality business graduates from Washington State University have crafted their own version of success in the hospitality industry.

Read about Jerry Jaeger ’84

 

Joe Fugere ’84

Seattle

Joe Fugere’s family influenced his meteoric rise in the food industry, albeit indirectly. His accolades including founding an award-winning Neapolitan pizza company in Seattle and advocating for small businesses on a local, state, and national level.

Fugere was actually considering architecture when he enrolled at WSU and attended an School for Hospitality Business Management open house.

“I liked the idea of getting a business degree and a degree in hospitality business … » More …

Roast goose with brussels sprouts and potatoes
Winter 2019

Cook your goose

Your goose is cooked.

Well, not yet.

But it can be—for Thanksgiving or Christmas or any other festive dinner this holiday season—with this recipe from the School of Hospitality Business Management at WSU’s Carson College of Business.

Executive Chef Jamie Callison developed the recipe for Washington State Magazine’s November 2019 issue. He was assisted by Chef de Cuisine Jason Butcherite and Student Culinary Lead Justin Walker.

Their roast goose features WSU honey and WSU Everything Seasoning—and makes for a stunning holiday centerpiece.

Use rendered goose fat to flavor fingerling potatoes for a side dish. And a touch of citrus brightens up another simple of roasted Brussels sprouts.

Bon … » More …

Irrigated water in the Columbia Basin. Photo Zach Mazur
Fall 2018

Three economists on the Columbia river

Retired Washington State University economist Norm Whittlesey is sitting at his kitchen table with two other retired economists, Walt Butcher and Ken Casavant. They are reminiscing about the collective 150 years they have worked on and around the Columbia River.

“We used to catch steelhead on the Snake River before the dam,” says Whittlesey. “I’ve got a picture of Walt with, what, a 25 pounder?”

Walt Butcher chuckles and says, “That fish might be up to 25 pounds by now.”

Casavant adds, “It’s been growing, even after being eaten.”

With a sweep of his hand across a map of the Columbia River watershed on the … » More …

Illustration of laptop as a slot machine
Summer 2018

Betting your digital dollar

Vast, haze-filled casino floors where rows of flashing colors light up expressionless faces endlessly feeding coins into a machine. Men sporting Hawaiian shirts rake piles of plastic chips across green felt tabletops, all seeking the hedonistic rush of hitting a jackpot seemingly just out of reach.

This is gambling as many of us know it. However, the combination of luck, wagering, and a chance at a payoff is far from a modern concept. As far back as the Paleolithic era, humans wagered on the roll of crude dice made from knuckle bones. Nonetheless, the staples of contemporary gambling—slot machines, card games, craps tables—may be considered … » More …

A WSU student takes a virtual trip to the 2018 Winter Olympics. Photo Robert Hubner
Summer 2018

Virtually yours

How do you walk through a building in Atlanta when you’re in a classroom in Pullman?

If you can’t be there physically, virtual reality can deliver a new level of engagement, whether it’s watching Shaun White’s snowboard whoosh inches from your head, or working collaboratively on construction projects with students from Georgia.

Virtual reality is also a rapidly growing business. There were an estimated seven million VR headsets in 2016, which is expected to balloon to 47 million by 2020.

That acceleration has pushed companies like Intel to ramp up their VR offerings, including the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea. The VR technology … » More …