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Gallery

Frog in Honduras. Photo Travis King
Spring 2018

Gallery: Wildlife of Honduras

WSU environmental biology doctoral student Travis King joined a team of biologists in 2017 to monitor wildlife in the remote region of La Mosquitia in Honduras, home to the newly-discovery “City of the Lost Monkey God.”

Travis and his colleagues in Conservation International and the Honduran government used motion-activated camera traps, hair collecting traps, and other methods to identify the wild animals in this untamed region. Below are some of the images that King brought back.

 

Read more about Travis and his research in “To catch a cat.”

Outside view of Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art/WSU
Spring 2018

Gallery: Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art/WSU

The new Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art/WSU, located directly south of the CUB on Terrell Mall, is a stunning addition to the Pullman campus with its unique mirrored glass exterior.

The six galleries of the Crimson Cube will feature visiting exhibitions, featured artists, and works from the museum’s permanent collection. Read about the grand opening of the museum.

(All photos by Robert Hubner except JSMOA entrance by Zach Mazur)

Cougar head on camera
Spring 2018

Gallery: Central Washington wildlife caught on camera

Using over 400 motion-activated camera traps, Washington State University wildlife biologist Daniel Thornton and his graduate students Travis King and Arthur Scully searched for the rare and elusive lynx in the Kettle Mountains and north Cascades of central Washington.

An assistant professor in the School of Environmental Science, Thornton led the largest lynx camera survey ever done in the state in 2016. The researchers found the first photographic evidence of a lynx in the Kettles in nearly two decades.

Read more about Thornton’s research on lynx. You can also read about Travis King and his work in both Washington and Central America in “» More …