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Design

Jason Chan (Courtesy Perkins+Will)
Winter 2017

Medical research design that’s 24/7

Jason Chan ’99 had to travel roughly 10,000 miles to satisfy a childhood curiosity. “I grew up in Singapore and the rate of urbanization is incredible there,” explains Chan. Interested in engineering and design, “architecture felt like a natural step.”

Chan, who specializes in medical and research facility architecture, first pursued his passion in Pullman. “I definitely had to look at architectural history and design studies with critiques. (Being a Cougar) helped me develop design skills,” Chan says.

Now a principal and regional leader for the research sector at Perkins+Will in Houston, Texas, his design prowess is on full display in concrete ways.

The Texas … » More …

Dynamic Duo
Fall 2013

Dynamic duo

As seniors at Lewis and Clark High School, Eric Brandon ’12 and Nick Linton ’13 often skipped lunch to create plans for a zero carbon emission housing development.

“Our friends would come and ask if we were ready to go to lunch, and we’d say just 10 more minutes, or 15 more minutes” Brandon says, replaying the conversations. Linton interjects with his own reenactment, “We have to finish this last little façade.”

In 2008 Brandon and Linton entered their proposed sustainable housing development, called Green Ridge, in Washington State University’s inaugural Imagine Tomorrow competition. The competition brings students together in interdisciplinary teams to address energy … » More …

Winter 2012

Master Plan for the WSU Pullman campus

Over the past 120 years, WSU has grown from a small agricultural college to a major research and teaching institution and adapted the campus as it changed. To prepare for the next 20 years, the University adopted a Campus Master Plan update which creates a framework for growth at the Pullman campus. The plan anticipates much growth in both student numbers and research efforts through 2030, with a framework for planning buildings, roads, and other infrastructure. The Master Plan has four primary goals: to create a superlative research campus, to build a sense of place with more open areas and a renovated campus core, to … » More …

Gallery: Images of Antarctica

While rock hunting across Antarctica last winter, WSU geochemist Jeff Vervoort was captivated by how the landscape revealed dramatic stories of merging glaciers, tortured ice, wind-sculpted snow, and glacial debris. But where he saw a language of science, Kathleen Ryan, an assistant professor of Interior Design, saw a language of aesthetic elements and principles, of curved lines, shapes, rhythm, and movement. The result was their interdisciplinary, husband-wife exhibit in spring’s Academic Showcase: Visual Language of Ice and Rock on the Frozen Continent

Vervoort’s Antarctica research was funded by the National Science Foundation and featured in The New York Times‘ “Scientist at Work” blog.

» More …

Fall 2003

Designing for dementia

A common clothesline can make a difference in preserving the dignity and self identity of Alzheimer’s patients, says Keith Diaz Moore, Washington State University professor of architecture and landscape architecture.

At Sedgewood Commons in Falmouth, Maine, a backyard clothesline engages residents of the 96-bed care facility in daily household tasks. It also represents how designers now are considering cultural aspects in building new and remodeled assisted-living facilities, explains Diaz Moore. “An outdoor yard, including a clothesline, historically has been an important part of New England family culture. Here it helps promote resident autonomy, and the ritual of maintaining the landscape encourages awareness and orientation.”

Diaz … » More …

Fall 2004

Cougar in the corn

Philipp Schmitt fashioned this elaborate Cougar Country corn maze on 14 acres east of Spokane near Liberty Lake last October. Each fall for the past five years, he’s used global positioning-coordinates beamed by satellite-to figure out where to plant the corn. Last year, he opted for the cougar-head logo, and relied on hand mapping to get all the details, including the whiskers, just right. The Pasco farmer attended Washington State University for five semesters from1994 to 1998.

Fall 2005

Bringing couture to campus

The annual Mom’s Weekend fashion show last spring featured the work of 13 Washington State University student designers. It was an impressive display, considering that it was the first time many of the young designers had created a multi-piece collection.

Not so for Beth Hearnesberger (’05 AMDT), who was participating in the show for the second time. This year, she received one of the “Best of Show” Mollie Pepper Outstanding Student Designer Awards. Like many of her classmates, Hearnesberger traded sleep for sewing to prepare her collection. She even hand dyed the fabrics for her dresses.

The brief fashion show is the culmination of a … » More …