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Book

Chadd Kahlsdorf
Spring 2021

Charles “Chadd” Kahlsdorf

The idea was simple: show kids how the work of a civil engineer impacts their daily lives and, just maybe, spark their interest enough to get them excited about their own future careers.

Charles “Chadd” Kahlsdorf (’14 MS Eng. Tech. Mgmt.) recently penned a children’s book about his chosen profession. He’s a principal engineer for a regional infrastructure engineering firm in Des Moines, Iowa, with experience in street and pavement design, grading and erosion control, water distribution systems, and more.

“There are a lot of picture books of structures and buildings, but I had never seen a book explain civil engineering at a kid’s level,” … » More …

Cover of book Remote by DJ Lee
Spring 2021

Remote: Finding Home in the Bitterroots

Cover of book Remote by DJ Lee

DJ Lee

Oregon State University Press: 2020

 

Places can possess us. Think of the stubbled, ochre hills of the Palouse in the chaffy light of October. No place possesses me more than the landscape defined by two rivers, the Lochsa and the Selway, where the rumpled land of the Bitterroot Mountains lies in the V between them.

Nearly 20 years ago, I told the writer DJ Lee, a Regents Professor of » More …

Cover of book Legacies of the Manhattan Project
Spring 2021

Legacies of the Manhattan Project: Reflections on 75 Years of a Nuclear World

Cover of book Legacies of the Manhattan Project

Edited by Michael Mays

WSU Press: 2020

 

Many of the academic essays in this book, the second in the Hanford Histories series, were first presented in 2017 at the Legacies of the Manhattan Project at 75 Years conference in Richland, situated along the southern edge of the Hanford Site. In his introduction, Michael Mays — professor of English at WSU Tri-Cities, director of the Hanford … » More …

Spring 2021

WSM staff picks for the pandemic

WSM staff picks

Here’s what the staff of Washington State Magazine has been reading, watching, and listening to since the start of the COVID-19 crisis.

 

Larry Clark (’94 Comm.)
Editor

Books

The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish (Gallery Books, 2017) – Haddish’s comedy shines through some rough times in this memoir. I was laughing out loud during several parts.

The Sheep Look Up by John Brunner (Harper, 1972) – A classic of science fiction and environmental destruction

Ivory Apples by Lisa Goldstein (Tachyon Publications, 2019) – I enjoy a good novel about fiction becoming reality, and obsession. Goldstein’s words are gripping and, at … » More …