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Book

Chadd Kahlsdorf
Spring 2021

Charles “Chadd” Kahlsdorf

The idea was simple: show kids how the work of a civil engineer impacts their daily lives and, just maybe, spark their interest enough to get them excited about their own future careers.

Charles “Chadd” Kahlsdorf (’14 MS Eng. Tech. Mgmt.) recently penned a children’s book about his chosen profession. He’s a principal engineer for a regional infrastructure engineering firm in Des Moines, Iowa, with experience in street and pavement design, grading and erosion control, water distribution systems, and more.

“There are a lot of picture books of structures and buildings, but I had never seen a book explain civil engineering at a kid’s level,” … » More …

Cover of book Remote by DJ Lee
Spring 2021

Remote: Finding Home in the Bitterroots

Cover of book Remote by DJ Lee

DJ Lee

Oregon State University Press: 2020

 

Places can possess us. Think of the stubbled, ochre hills of the Palouse in the chaffy light of October. No place possesses me more than the landscape defined by two rivers, the Lochsa and the Selway, where the rumpled land of the Bitterroot Mountains lies in the V between them.

Nearly 20 years ago, I told the writer DJ Lee, a Regents Professor of » More …

Cover of book Legacies of the Manhattan Project
Spring 2021

Legacies of the Manhattan Project: Reflections on 75 Years of a Nuclear World

Cover of book Legacies of the Manhattan Project

Edited by Michael Mays

WSU Press: 2020

 

Many of the academic essays in this book, the second in the Hanford Histories series, were first presented in 2017 at the Legacies of the Manhattan Project at 75 Years conference in Richland, situated along the southern edge of the Hanford Site. In his introduction, Michael Mays — professor of English at WSU Tri-Cities, director of the Hanford History … » More …

Spring 2021

WSM staff picks for the pandemic

WSM staff picks

Here’s what the staff of Washington State Magazine has been reading, watching, and listening to since the start of the COVID-19 crisis.

 

Larry Clark (’94 Comm.)
Editor

Books

The Last Black Unicorn by Tiffany Haddish (Gallery Books, 2017) – Haddish’s comedy shines through some rough times in this memoir. I was laughing out loud during several parts.

The Sheep Look Up by John Brunner (Harper, 1972) – A classic of science fiction and environmental destruction

Ivory Apples by Lisa Goldstein (Tachyon Publications, 2019) – I enjoy a good novel about fiction becoming reality, and obsession. Goldstein’s words are gripping and, at … » More …

Butch Cougar in front of a pile of books
Spring 2021

What to read: Books by alumni, faculty, and staff

Here’s a round-up of reading recommendations featuring titles by WSU alumni, faculty, and staff—including one to watch for later this spring.

Anything and everything by Buddy Levy. The celebrated author of seven books, Levy specializes in historical narrative, particularly epic adventures and survival stories—perfect for the pandemic, which makes us all armchair travelers. Levy’s taught writing at WSU for more than 30 years, and his own writing—meticulously researched, masterfully organized—simply sings. His riveting narratives make readers feel like they are right there with protagonists, experiencing everything they’re going through.

Buddy Levy: Historical investigator” from the Summer 2011 issue

Labyrinth … » More …

Butch Cougar in front of a pile of books
Spring 2021

What to read: Offerings from WSU Press

Here’s a round-up of reading recommendations featuring 11 titles curated by the staff at WSU Press.

Be Brave, Tah-hy!: The Journey of Chief Joseph’s Daughter by Jack R. Williams with illustrations by Jo Proferes (2012). Exquisitely illustrated and rich with depictions of Nimiipuu Dreamer culture, Tah-hy’s young voice narrates this novel about the harrowing 1877 flight of the Nez Perce.

Edge of Tomorrow: An Arctic Year by Sam Wright (1998). Living in a hand-built, 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin in the Brooks Range of Alaska 100 miles inside the Arctic Circle, Wright records his experiences and thoughts through seasonal changes, as he and his wife spend … » More …

Butch Cougar in front of a pile of books
Spring 2021

Recommended reading

The persisting pandemic just might be the perfect time for relishing the power of books.

To transport us through time and space. To offer us insight and entertainment. To help us remember and make us forget. To lessen our stress and sense of loss and isolation. To give us courage and hope. To connect us and inspire us.

Books are both refuge and door, providing shelter from the storm as well as ways to escape to different worlds and discover new things. Many of us have turned to them for respite while we’re all largely sequestered in our homes.

Here, Washington State University faculty and … » More …