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Alumni

Fall 2002

Graduate School alumni honored during centennial

To mark a century of graduate education at Washington State University, nine alumni, one from each academic college, were honored with the Graduate Alumni Achievement Award at an April 16 recognition luncheon. The award was established in 2000 by the WSU Graduate School. This year’s recipients were Joseph Jwu-Shan Jen, Agriculture and Home Economics; Gary Brinson, Business and Economics; Herbert M. Berg, Education; Edmund O. Schweitzer III, Engineering and Architecture; Michael Yellowbear Holloman, Liberal Arts; Gary E. Isom, Pharmacy; Gordon D. Hager, Sciences; Janice M. Linehan, Nursing; and Travis C. McGuire, Veterinary Medicine.

Joseph Jwu-Shan Jen (’64 M.S. Food Science), Washington, D.C., is undersecretary of … » More …

Fall 2002

Palmers want to give others hope for the future

Sometime in the near future Perry Palmer and his wife, Marcie, want to return to the Colville Indian Reservation. Young students there lack good role models, as well as incentives, Perry says. They need to be made aware of opportunities for advanced education and benefit from them as the Palmers have.

Perry completed a master’s degree in education at Washington State University in May. Marcie will finish her doctorate in counseling psychology next May.

Both are members of the Colville Confederated Tribes. They met on the reservation, where Marcie spent three years as a social worker for Child Protective Services, and were married there in … » More …

Fall 2002

Each on his own merits

Identical triplets Donald, Jack, and Joseph Claros appear to be mirror images—5 feet, 4 inches tall, 125 pounds, whitewall haircuts, small wire rimmed glasses. They are soft-spoken, polite, and typically respond to questions from their elders with a “Yes sir” or “No madam.” Sometimes they dress the same—camouflage fatigues or dress green uniforms—as Army ROTC cadets at Washington State University.

Jack (architectural studies) and Donald (communications) received their degrees and Army commissions May 11. Joseph switched from interior design to communications. He will graduate in December.

The military has been a means to an end for the brothers, helping them finance their college education and … » More …

Fall 2002

From farm to College Hill, the migration continues

When Don Appel left the family farm at Endicott in the 1930s to enroll at Washington State College, he didn’t know what he was starting. Or where it would end.

Unfortunately, failing eyesight ultimately forced him to withdraw from school one semester short of graduating. He returned to farming but continued to stress the importance of education. In 1979 he was awarded a degree in engineering. Now all nine of his children hold Washington State University degrees. They were followed by a third generation of graduates. A fourth is in the queue.

Dick Appel (’59 Agri. Engr.), Don’s oldest, was the first in the family … » More …

Fall 2002

Gillies receives Alumni Achievement Award

Cliff Gillies, longtime executive director of the Washington Intercollegiate Activities Association (WIAA, 1982-93) and former president of the National Federation of State High Schools Association (1990-91), has received the Washington State University Alumni Achievement Award. The award was presented February 4 during the 2002 Man of the Year banquet in South Bend, Washington.

Gillies was recognized for leadership and service to the youth of Washington as a teacher, coach, counselor, principal, assistant superintendent, and as executive director of the WIAA during a career that spanned more than 40 years.

As executive director of the WIAA, Gillies and his staff were responsible for overseeing athletics for … » More …

Summer 2002

Lt. Col. Stinemetz wanted to convey his condolences

Word of CIA agent Mike Spann’s death November 29, 2001 in Afghanistan struck a chord with Washington State University graduate Lt. Col. Kurt Stinemetz (’76 Anthro.), U.S. Marine Corps. Spann was the first U.S. casualty in the war on terrorism in Afghanistan. Spann was killed in an uprising of Taliban prisoners being held for interrogation. His hometown was Winfield, Alabama, population 1,200.

Stinemetz oversees the Montgomery Military Entrance Processing Station 200 miles away from Winfield. Some 16,000 men and women in Alabama wanting to enlist in all branches of the military and National Guard annually pass through the facility.

Stinemetz and Spann shared a common … » More …

Summer 2002

Ehlo inducted into Pac-10 Hall of Honor

Former Washington State University basketball coach George Raveling once described Craig Ehlo (’86 Soc. Sci.) as “playing on the ragged edge of being out of control.” In other words, Ehlo made things happen. His full-speed-ahead approach on the court produced some turnovers, but also a host of steals resulting in easy baskets for the Washington State basketball team.

The former Cougar star was one of 10 inaugural basketball inductees into the Pacific-10 Conference Hall of Honor. The ceremony was held during the Pac-10 Men’s Basketball Tournament at the Staples Arena in Los Angeles in March.

Other inductees included coaching greats John Wooden (UCLA) and Pete … » More …

Summer 2002

Alumni Association honors past presidents

Three former presidents of the Washington State University Alumni Association have received WSU’s Alumni Achievement Award. Jim Miller, Vancouver, and Denny Jones, Redmond, were recognized in mid-November at the association’s reception for past presidents in Bellevue. John B. “Jack” Sutherland, Tacoma, was unable to attend. He received the award in December.

Miller (’65 Police Sci.,) was cited “for exemplary leadership as a district director and president (1995-96) of the Alumni Association, and for effective advocacy in supporting University programs in student enrichment, academic outreach, and intercollegiate athletics.”

Miller came to WSU from Tacoma. After earning his degree, he stayed on to complete his teaching credentials … » More …

Summer 2002

Early leader of WSU’s Native American students

Ki Tecumseh learned to work within the system—or stretch it

“Indian people don’t consider themselves to be a minority people.” – Ki Tecumseh

Growing up on the Yakama Indian Reservation, Kiutus “Ki” Tecumseh, Jr. learned to put his finger up to the wind to test the direction it was blowing. In his ideas and actions, he also likes to test conventional thought. A longtime public relations specialist with the Department of Energy in Albuquerque, New Mexico, he is soft-spoken and measured in his speech. But people tend to listen to what he has to say, more than how he says it.

For example, in the … » More …