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Visual arts

Winter 2005

Pop Art in Pullman

This fall, Washington State University’s Museum of Art is showing more than 70 works by pop artist Roy Lichtenstein. Entitled Roy Lichtenstein Prints 1956-97, the exhibit offers a comprehensive record of the artist’s evolution. Lichtenstein explored commercial and comic book images and painted them in immense scale, utilizing bright colors, simple lines, and the dot patterns associated with newsprint reproduction. Although his work was controversial in the 1960s, it changed the way America looked at and thought about art.

The exhibit, from the private collection of Jordan D. Schnitzer of Portland, Oregon, continues in Pullman through December 16 before moving to the Henry Art Gallery … » More …

Fall 2005

Bringing couture to campus

The annual Mom’s Weekend fashion show last spring featured the work of 13 Washington State University student designers. It was an impressive display, considering that it was the first time many of the young designers had created a multi-piece collection.

Not so for Beth Hearnesberger (’05 AMDT), who was participating in the show for the second time. This year, she received one of the “Best of Show” Mollie Pepper Outstanding Student Designer Awards. Like many of her classmates, Hearnesberger traded sleep for sewing to prepare her collection. She even hand dyed the fabrics for her dresses.

The brief fashion show is the culmination of a … » More …

Spring 2009

Robert Helm, 65 – Acclaimed Northwest artist, teacher

Robert Helm, an acclaimed Northwest artist known for surreal imagery and exquisite craftsmanship, died October 21, 2008. He was 65.
Helm was born in Wallace, Idaho, and attended North Central High School in Spokane, where he met Tamara Kimpel. They married in 1966 and had a daughter, Brenna, and a son, Boone. He earned his M.F.A. degree at WSU in 1969 and taught at the University of Colorado before returning to teach at WSU from 1971-84.

After leaving WSU, Helm and Tamara continued to live and work in their studios in their beloved wheat fields between Pullman and Moscow. From there, his art went … » More …

Spring 2006

Growing as an Artist

windows along the north wall look out over Martin Stadium. They offer quite a view, especially on game days, says Powell.

On one wall hang two of his latest pieces, paintings on birch plywood, a medium he says gives him more of a feeling of permanence than canvas.

When starting on a piece, Powell creates a situation for himself and then sets about reducing it. He begins by filling the wood plane with multiple lines and forms with graphite and ink, and then painting over them with a neutral-colored acrylic, sanding it down, tweaking and tuning, finding and isolating forms, until just a few … » More …

Spring 2006

The Clothesline Project

Haunting and colorful, the Clothesline Project usually stops students in their tracks as they head across the Glenn Terrell Mall to class. It’s a display of several hundred t-shirts made by people connected to Washington State University with messages about how violence, particularly against women, can affect individuals, families, and communities. For a week last October, the campus community had a chance to read the words of victim/survivors and their friends.

Summer 2008

On the road

Museum of Art director Chris Bruce has not been content of late to just set up a traveling show and then send it back. He’d just as soon put the show together and make sure it gets seen as much as possible by putting it on the road. Bruce started with a major Roy Lichtenstein exhibition a couple of years ago. After arranging with collector Jordan Schnitzer to assemble the exhibition, he sent it around the West to seven other museums, from the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle to the Austin Art Museum in Texas, making it possible for over 117,000 people to see work … » More …

Fall 2008

The end is the beginning. A photo essay

A Chinese native who was born during the Cultural Revolution, Jian Yang '08 found his artistic self somewhere in between his home country and the United States. That understanding of the in-between is perhaps why, on a visit home after spending some time here in graduate school, he discovered a fascination for the disappearing tradition of rural Chinese opera. » More ...
Summer 2008

Color + Modulation

Rob Tyler ’96
2006

Rob Tyler’s animated films combine hand-painted film cells, computer manipulation and atmospheric electronic music to produce a hypnotic come-hither based on changing, pulsing colors that riff off a primary abstract shape to the music of Unrecognizable Now, Moksha Kusa, Carpet Music, In Support of Living, and Solar Marquardt. Although there is no indication that these films are meant for anything more than a DVD-scale viewing, Tyler’s films may recall (for those … » More …