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Photography

Northwest bounty still life
Spring 2012

A delicious dilemma: Ingredients for a photographic still life

A Feast of Good Things - photo by Bruce Andre

With Washington’s abundance of food, we struggled to limit the still life photo for our feature “A Feast of Good Things” to just a few ingredients. Besides the native, naturally occurring foods like shellfish and salmon, our state rates second in the nation in sheer number of crops produced. Here’s a sampling:

Olympia oyster  While clams and other oysters reach market size in two years or less, the Olympia can take four to five years. Even then, it’s still quite small. Native to our waters, … » More …

Spring 2012

A Hidden History

In 1992, Frank Hirahara ’48 sent his daughter Patti to Yakima to help his elderly parents pack up their home for their move to Southern California.

What had at first seemed a chore turned into a treasure hunt as Patti unearthed letters, photographs, and official records that chronicled her family’s experience as Japanese Americans who had spent World War II in an internment camp. “These things were hidden all around the house,” she says. She discovered notes in the buffet, letters in the kitchen cupboard, and photo negatives tucked into books.

Frank’s grandfather Motokichi Hirahara came to Washington from Wakayama Prefecture in Japan in 1909. … » More …

About the cover:Hinoki House by Michael Mathers

Spring 2011 cover

Architect Rex Hohlbein ’81 sits with clients Jim and Ann in an open sliding window of their home in Clyde Hill, Washington. The Hinoki House, a new view home in Bellevue’s 1950s Clyde Hill neighborhood, is exemplary of what has become known as “Northwest style.”

A hallmark of the house is walls made out of windows which lets in light and views of the trees, pond, and courtyard. In the living room, where the windows slide away, it opens into a stunning view of Lake Washington. There is a comfortable feeling of elegance and peacefulness within, along with … » More …

Fall 2004

Viewing life through the lens of a camera

After a dozen years as a photojournalist with KIRO-TV, Brian Miller left the security of a television-station job in 1998 to start his own company, Wide Angle TV.

Two factors influenced his decision-time and money. And he yearned to be independent.

He now works one-third as much as he did before and earns three times the money, he says. But the freelance business can be unpredictable, subject to such variables as the weather and the economy.

Miller won’t venture a guess at an “average” work week. “There isn’t any”-and he’s fine with that. Some days he might put in 15-20 hours-when he’s working. The downside … » More …

Summer 2004

A Winner: Small-World Photomicrography

This photograph of a thin copper film surface by former Washington State University materials science student Megan Cordill won 16th place in Nikon’s 29th annual Small World Competition. The photograph is part of a touring exhibit.

The previous year, Cordill placed both first and third in the Cornell University Microscopy Image Competition.  Cordill received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at WSU in 2002 and 2003, and is now working toward her Ph.D. in materials science and engineering at the University of Minnesota.

Spring 2004

Architecture from the Weapons of War

Homes constructed from artillery shells. Military tanks used as foundations for bridges. Flowerpots that were once parts of missiles. In Afghanistan, a generation of war has resulted in a strange new architecture, built from the implements of destruction. A series of photographs by Washington State University professor Rafi Samizay on Afghanistan and its architecture will be on display starting March 9 at the WSU Museum of Art. Titled “Afghanistan: Land of Light and Shadow,” the show is cocurated by Robert Barnstone, assistant professor in the School of Architecture and Construction Management, and Roger Rowley, Museum of Art curator and collections manager. In conjunction with the … » More …