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Review

On this borrowed bike cover
Spring 2015

On This Borrowed Bike

On This Borrowed Bike
Lisa Panepinto ’05
Three Rooms Press, 2014

Rivers flow through the poems in Panepinto’s slim volume. They whisper of the Northwest, of young people who have jumped in, of silvery fish and poison in the water. In her first collection, the Spokane native writes with a deft lyricism and of a sense of place in poems like “river metallic as veins of saints”:

“the land creates
its inhabitants
here I am low
down bog like”

Her other poems speak of Spokane and rural roads, and music festivals and blues … » More …

Hunting for Dirtbags cover
Spring 2015

Hunting for “Dirtbags”: Why Cops Over-police the Poor and Racial Minorities

Hunting for “Dirtbags”: Why Cops Over-police the Poor and Racial Minorities

Lori Beth Way and Ryan Patten ’03 PhD
Northeastern University Press, 2013

In this day of increased scrutiny of police, many people wonder about policing styles and how officers use their unassigned time. The high rate of minority arrests and stops as well as the higher level of surveillance in poor communities have also come into question.

With these things in mind, two political science colleagues at California State University, Chico explored what factors influence police officers’ decisions on their policing strategies. Patten and Way … » More …

Looking like the Enemy cover
Spring 2015

Looking Like the Enemy: Japanese Mexicans, the Mexican State, and US Hegemony, 1897-1945

Looking Like the Enemy: Japanese Mexicans, the Mexican State, and US Hegemony, 1897-1945 by Jerry Garcia '99 PhD
Jerry García ’99 PhD

The University of Arizona Press, 2014

Eizi Matuda and his wife Miduho Kaneko de Matuda were Japanese immigrants who had become Mexican citizens and had lived there for 20 years when agents of the Mexican government came to their home to relocate them. However, unlike thousands of Japanese Americans and some Japanese Mexicans who were relocated during World War II, the Matudas were not forced to move. Instead, local Chiapas leaders vouched for their loyalty … » More …

After Artest
Winter 2014

New & Noteworthy for Winter 2014

After Artest: The NBA and the Assault on Blackness by David J. Leonard  SUNY Press, 2012 :: After a brawl at a Pistons-Pacers game in 2004, the NBA adopted policies to govern black players and prevent them from embracing styles and personas associated with blackness. This book by Leonard, associate professor of critical culture, gender, and race studies at Washington State University, discloses connections between the NBA’s discourse and the broader discourse of anti-black racism.

Emergence and Collapse of Early Villages Timothy A. Kohler (editor), Mark D. Varien (editor)  University of California Press, 2012 :: This book examines how climate change, population size, interpersonal conflict, … » More …

Trail to Gold
Winter 2014

Trail to Gold: The Pend Oreille Route

Trail to Gold
Linda Hackbarth
Museum of North Idaho, 2014

During the Pacific Northwest’s mining boom in the second half of the nineteenth century, small communities to house and supply miners appeared throughout the West. And the need to move supplies into these areas lead to the arrival of steamboats on Lake Pend Oreille and the Clark Fork River.

Author Linda Hackbarth looks into the area around Lake Pend Oreille in the 1860s and the … » More …

Red Light to Starboard
Winter 2014

Red Light to Starboard: Recalling the Exxon Valdez Disaster

Red Light to Starboard

Angela Day
WSU Press, 2014

The Exxon Valdez and its 53 million gallons of crude oil made history on March 24, 1989. In the weeks and months that followed, more than 10 million gallons of oil bubbled into Alaska’s Prince William Sound.

Thousands of company menus, recorded meetings, news articles, and government documents provided Angela Day ample material for her book.

She corrals those notes and perspectives from whistleblowers, cannery workers, … » More …

Nikkei Baseball
Winter 2014

Nikkei Baseball: Japanese American Players from Immigration and Internment to the Major Leagues

Nikkei Baseball

Samuel O. Regalado ’83 MA, ’87 PhD
University of Illinois Press, 2013

Since Sam Regalado received his doctorate in history in 1987, he has established himself as one of the leading authorities on the history of baseball and the Hispanic population in the United States. Now a professor at California State University Stanislaus, Regalado has penned an eminently readable history on how baseball helped Americans of Japanese descent construct an identity.

Regalado’s interest in … » More …

Elder Crow - Said and Done
Fall 2014

New & Noteworthy

Elder Crow - Said and Done
Said & Done
by Elder Crow, 2014 :: Tyler Morgan ’03 and his band crank up some old-school rock and roll in their debut album. The Vancouver, Washington, group blends lyrics of social justice and civil rights with roaring guitars and solid drumming straight out of the ’60s and ’70s. Morgan, a high school history teacher in Camas, sings lead and plays rhythm guitar alongside drummer Eddie Esparza, bassist … » More …

Races of Mankind
Fall 2014

Races of Mankind: The Sculptures of Malvina Hoffman

Races of Mankind

Marianne Kinkel
University of Illinois Press, 2011

In the struggle to find out what makes people unique, artists of the twentieth century entered the field of physical anthropology. In 1930, Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History commissioned sculptor Malvina Hoffman to research and create sculptures of all races of mankind, of which there were believed to be more than 160.

Marianne Kinkel, an associate professor of fine arts at Washington State … » More …

Island Queens and Mission Wives
Fall 2014

Island Queens and Mission Wives: How Gender and Empire Remade Hawai‘i’s Pacific World

Island Queens and Mission Wives

Jennifer Thigpen
University of North Carolina Press, 2014

When white missionaries landed on the sunlit shores of Hawai‘i in the early nineteenth century, they believed they were bringing God, culture, and civilization. They failed to realize that instead they were pulled into a sophisticated and long-standing system of Hawaiian diplomacy.

The missionaries’ relationship with the ruling families of Hawai‘i has long been the subject of study. But Thigpen, an associate … » More …