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Food

Winter 2004

Training Table

Cougar Etiquette Dinner

Skillfully sidestepping the busy wait staff, Mylene Barizo circulates among the 100 diners attending the Cougar Etiquette Dinner in the Todd Hall atrium. She stops, chats casually with student-athletes seated around tables for eight, then moves on. Members of the athletic department, other University units, and Pullman community leaders are table hosts.

Barizo encourages questions, offers advice. Trying to catch people between bites is tricky. The three-course meal includes grilled Coho salmon, mai-fun noodle lace, oven-roasted game hen, garlic potato puree, and sautéed seasonal vegetables. Dessert is raspberry sorbet.

Barizo is regional human resources manager for dinner sponsor Enterprise Rent-A-Car. As a … » More …

Summer 2007

It's rhubarb pie time!

Barry Swanson, professor of food science, and I see eye to eye on at least one significant issue. We like our rhubarb pie to be made exclusively with rhubarb. NOT strawberries. Just rhubarb.

However, Swanson actually prefers his rhubarb as sauce, over ice cream. Although Swanson does no research on the tart vegetable, he is an avid enthusiast and considers it an acidic parallel to his work with cranberries. And obviously, given his rhubarb enthusiasm, Swanson is from the Midwest, where every old farmstead has a rhubarb patch. “Mom always made rhubarb pie in the spring,” he says.

Rhubarb is also known by Midwesterners as … » More …

Stuffed Peppers from the Harrah Café

12 large peppers-cut tops off, seed, and blanch. 3 lbs lean hamburger Diced pepper tops 1 medium onion, diced 2 cups instant rice 3 cups tomato sauce (reserve enough to top peppers) 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 1/2 tbsp. Johnny’s seasoning dash of Tabasco sauce optional 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese

Mix all ingredients, stuff peppers, top each pepper with tomato sauce. Bake at 350 degrees for one hour. Top with cheese last five minutes.

P.S. Please be mindful we are country cooks and don’t measure a thing. These are approximate amounts. Just play around with it!

Tana Olney, Owner Susan March, Manager … » More …

Winter 2005

A Sweet Buzz: Honey

Entomologist Steve Sheppard has never gotten over his wonder at how people came to raise swarms of stinging insects for the honey they produce.

“To see this guy dumping out thousands of bees to collect honey from their hive. . .” He shakes his head. “It’s amazing that humans ever figured it out to do that.”

But the Washington State University associate professor, who not only keeps bees himself, but unflinchingly opens beehives with his bare hands, understands the passion for honey.

People prize it as a delicacy and demand it as a staple. They cherish some honeys for their color and admire others for … » More …

Fall 2009

Washington potatoes

Judging by his occasional ribald references to the potato, Shakespeare considered the exotic tuber primarily as an aphrodisiac. Although the time of the potato’s introduction to Europe from the New World is not clear, recent scholarship has determined that the potato was grown in Spain as early as 1570. But the potato is an odd vegetable. Potatoes of that era were not uniformly oblong and smooth, but came in many colors and shapes, with odd protuberances that reminded some of, well, body parts. Although Indians had eaten them for thousands of years, Europeans were mystified, if not titillated.

But they got more adventurous. And the … » More …