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Intercollegiate

Karen Troyanello
Fall 2022

The face of the case

Track-and-field standout Karen (Blair) Troianello (’80 Comm.) became the face of the benchmark equal rights case against Washington State University.

Blair vs. Washington State University was a milestone for women’s rights in Washington, setting a precedent for public four-year colleges and universities. The case went to the state Supreme Court, which—in 1987—ruled in favor of the coaches and athletes.

Coaches and female athletes at WSU had sued the university in 1979 over inadequate funding and other support for women’s athletics under the state Equal Rights Amendment, enacted the same year as Title IX of the Education Amendments Act. The 1972 federal law states: “No person … » More …

Washington State University mascot Butch Cougar greets a young boy in a winter coat
Fall 2022

Happiness is…

 

The lovable, iconic mascot Butch T. Cougar always brings smiles and laughs to Coug fans with his antics on field and court at Washington State University. High-fiving 90-year-olds and hugging kids, crowd-surfing the student section and riding his three-wheeler at football games, dancing to marching band tunes and cheering on the teams⁠—Butch shares joy wherever he goes, ever since the first WSU students put on the suit in 1976. And it’s more than just sports. Butch’s visits to charity events, weddings, schools, and holiday gatherings around the state are guaranteed to light up the place. Dean N. Grevé (’81 Comm.) was the first student dedicated to … » More …

NCAA-TitleIX logo
Fall 2022

Reflection: On 50 years of Title IX and the state’s equal rights amendment

Four years after Title IX was enacted, I headed off to WSU, hoping to study journalism and run track. At that point, I hadn’t even heard of Title IX, the landmark legislation that codified gender equity in education, though it probably played a role in my high-school sports career. It may be why the cross-country coach had to let a few of us girls turn out with the boys’ team—because we didn’t have one of our own.

I barely remember how I found my way onto the track team. In my memory, I saw a notice on a bulletin board and showed up for the … » More …