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Campus life

Fall 2005

Heart Trouble

Last fall workers planted a painted bronze heart sculpture by internationally known artist Jim Dine just steps from Stadium Way on one of Washington State University’s busiest intersections.

Painted bright blue, the sculpture stands about 12 feet high and is encrusted with a colorful array of objects-tools, shoes, sculpted heads, and much else.

While the local art community was congratulating itself on the significant Technicolor Heart acquisition, which was made a permanent campus fixture with money from the Washington Arts Commission, a smattering of students were railing against it.

In a letter to the editor at the Daily Evergreen last spring, one pharmacy student suggested … » More …

Summer 2005

University buys Adams Mall

In 1909 it opened as a schoolhouse and became the center of the College Hill community. In the ’80s it was made into a shopping center for retail and restaurants and a hot night spot at the heart of the Greek system. And this summer, Adams Mall will go through another transformation.

Washington State University recently bought the two-story brick building for $1.5 million and has retained Corporate Pointe Developers to redesign the site and manage it for the next 30 years.

“It’s part of the College Hill revitalization project,” says Mel Taylor, WSU’s director of special projects. For several years, the University has been … » More …

Fall 2007

Police in the dorms: Security or invasion of privacy?

One Friday night last winter, a Washington State University police officer walked past the open door of a student’s room in Stephenson East and looked in. She smiled and said “Hey,” and received a cool “Hi” in reply. As soon as she walked past, the student shut the door and clicked the lock.

Officer Dawn Daniels has come to expect a range of reactions as she patrols the hallways of residence halls. Sometimes she gets a friendly “Hello.” Other times, the doors slam.

In spring 2006, the right of Daniels and her fellow WSU officers to patrol the halls came into question, when an officer … » More …

Video: This is W.S.C. – 1952, featuring Edward R. Murrow

An introduction to Washington State College from 1952, narrated by Edward R. Murrow.

This film shows campus and student activities in 1952, from engineering students to football games to housing. Edward R. Murrow narrates the tour around WSC, which emphasizes research, practical training and extension mission as a land grant college.

Courtesy: WSU Libraries – Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections 

Excerpt: 5 minutes, 32 seconds

Click here for the full video (22 minutes, 41 seconds)

Winter 2008

Living free from addiction

When an alumnus like Bus Hollingbery ’44, a former Cougar linebacker and son of football coaching legend “Babe” Hollingbery, comes to the university with a good idea, the university listens.

A few years ago, Hollingbery, a recovering alcoholic, was thinking about how difficult it can be to start recovery. His own grandson, Will, had just taken a leave of absence from WSU to sort out his life and get clean. For a kid like Will, returning to campus and falling back in with his old friends and routines could be a problem, he thought. So while here for a football game one weekend, Bus wondered … » More …

Summer 2006

Foreign stories

Crista Ames and Junko Matsumura are both bright, friendly, and soft-spoken. They are just a few months apart in age. And both want to go out and see the world.

It was these common interests that brought the student from Kennewick and the student from Osaka together at McCroskey Hall last winter. They’re roommates in a program that pairs international students with American counterparts to foster greater understanding between cultures. The residence hall, a former women’s dormitory that was remodeled in 2001, is home to close to 70 students, half of whom hail from places like Japan, France, Wales, China, and Bahrain. In all, WSU … » More …

Spring 2006

The Clothesline Project

Haunting and colorful, the Clothesline Project usually stops students in their tracks as they head across the Glenn Terrell Mall to class. It’s a display of several hundred t-shirts made by people connected to Washington State University with messages about how violence, particularly against women, can affect individuals, families, and communities. For a week last October, the campus community had a chance to read the words of victim/survivors and their friends.