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Alumni

Dominic Dipietco with search dog Jeb
Summer 2018

To the rescue

Jennifer Brown ’99 grew up thinking a team of horses would be required to pull her away from an equine veterinarian career. Although Brown thought she was not that strong in science during high school, her love of training horses and interacting with the animals propelled her to pursue a doctorate of veterinary medicine at WSU.

The heroism displayed during the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, however, introduced Brown to a new possibility. “During my residency, 9/11 happened,” Brown says. “That obviously made a big impression on many people and one of the things that impressed me was the work of the search and … » More …

Class Notes
Summer 2018

Class notes

1950s

The Central Washington Sports Hall of Fame will induct its inaugural class in June, which includes Pete Rademacher (’53 Ani. Sci.). Rademacher was a Gold Gloves champion who won the gold medal in heavyweight boxing at the 1956 Olympics. The class also includes two WSU alumni who have passed away: Gene Conley (x’50) and Chuck “Bobo” Brayton (’50, ’59 MS Phys. Ed.). Conley was the only person to have won both a MLB World Series and NBA championship. Brayton was a Hall of Fame baseball coach who coached 33 years at WSU.

1970s

Ronald F. Marshall (’71 Phil.) delivered the endowed … » More …

In Memoriam
Summer 2018

In memoriam

1930s

Ann Elizabeth Danby (’38 Busi.), 101, December 2, 2017, Eugene, Oregon.

1940s

Albert H. Adams (’41 Gen. St.), 97, November 27, 2017, Green Valley, Arizona.

Lena “Lee” Corral Barry (’41 Home Econ.), 100, January 10, 2018, Castro Valley, California.

Mavis L. Engelland (’41 Phys. Ed.), 97, December 25, 2017, Gig Harbor.

Herman E. Petway (x’41 Ed.), 99, January 2, 2018, Vineland, New Jersey.

Kenneth William Sax (’41 Mat. Sci.), 99, January 9, 2018, Sacramento, California.

Elaine Berry (x’42 Lib. Arts), 100, October 30, 2017, Wenatchee.

Edna J. Fast Maguire (’42 Busi.), 96, December 22, 2017, Wenatchee.

Jean Mary E. Nichols (’42 Gen. St., ’44 … » More …

Alumni News
Summer 2018

A little help from a friend

When you hear about the WSU Alumni Association, you might think of fun events and crowds of spirited Cougs. For students and recent grads, the WSUAA can also be a source of help in making the transition from college into the “real world.” By taking advantage of their membership in the WSUAA, students and new grads can participate in networking events with successful alumni, seek career opportunities (after all, Cougs love to hire fellow Cougs), and connect with Association chapters around the country as they plan their next steps. We find the stories of some of our recent graduates inspiring. We hope you will, … » More …

Kimbrough Hall piano with image of woman playing overlaid
Summer 2018

WSU in 100 words

A mini-essay contest

Every Coug has a story. That’s what we’ve discovered over the years—from memorable football games to wedding engagements to midnight donut runs, WSU alumni have got some great memories. Now we’d like to hear your Washington State story in 100 words or less.

Pick your favorite memory and send it to us. The top essays will receive a can of legendary Cougar Gold cheese or a WSU hat.

Send us your 100-word WSU memory by June 1, 2018, through the contact form below, You can also email wsm@wsu.edu, or send a letter.

We’ll print our favorites in the August issue and … » More …

Keith Jackson at WSU Martin Stadium
Summer 2018

Keith Jackson 1928–2018

When I finally met Keith Jackson ’54 last summer, I felt like I was meeting a friend. He didn’t know it, but we had already spent numerous Saturdays together. While he was calling the biggest games in college football, I was a fan, enjoying not just the games, but the spectacle and excitement that Keith communicated so skillfully to audiences.

Listening to Keith call a game, it was easy to get lost in the excitement of the event. He was a nearly flawless professional—this was obvious to even a casual fan. What set Keith apart from other broadcasters is that he respected the games and … » More …

Summer 2018

Finding identity and expression at WSU

Bob Dlugosh says that he and his roommate, Al, “were always chumming around Pullman together.” Best friends, Bob figured Al for straight, but he liked the guy so much he didn’t let it bother him. Bob did wonder if Al knew he was gay. In 1968, “gay” felt like a brand new word. So it probably wasn’t the one used on the sign Al and Bob found tacked to their Stephenson Hall door: “Bob and Al are gay.”

But that’s what Robert Dlugosh ’71 recalls decades later. The noun was probably something from the much crueler vernacular of the day: They were being called faggots, … » More …

Kara Rowe with camera and chickens
Summer 2018

From Wilbur to the world

Time for a pop quiz. Name at least one famous female farmer. If you’re coming up dry, you’re not alone—but Kara Rowe ’00 wants to change that. An executive producer at Emmy-award winning North by Northwest in Spokane, Rowe is a champion of all things agricultural—especially women farmers.

Rowe, together with NxNW partner Dave Tanner, and Audra Mulkern, a photographer, foodie, and founder of the Female Farmer Project, are raising funds for a documentary called Women’s Work: The Untold Story of America’s Female Farmers. The producers hope to correct a longstanding problem with the history of ag … » More …

First Words
Spring 2018

Forged by fire

The intricate mastery of Japanese swordmaking relies on a smith’s deep understanding of fire, metal, and techniques to control both. Each unique sword shimmers with thousands of layers from the folding of the metal, a work of art in steel. That steel, though, traditionally comes from an iron-rich sand full of impurities, pounded and blended by the smith. A smith then uses a secret mix of water, clay, ash, and other ingredients over the blade as they once again plunge the sword into fire to create a keen edge. Only when the blade glows a certain color is it quenched in water.

Humans have learned … » More …

E. Garry Hill
Spring 2018

Running up the competition

If you want the facts about track and field records, ask a statistics junkie like E. Garry Hill ’69. But he might throw you with another fact, this one culled from long experience as editor of Track & Field News, announcer at the Olympics and World championships, and expert on the sport: Track and field as a spectator sport is struggling mightily.

Rows and rows of empty seats faced runners and field athletes competing at the Rio Olympics. And where can you watch big track events on TV? Hill calls it like he sees it, and he’s seen a lot since he competed for Washington … » More …