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Food

The barns at WSU’s research station in Puyallup.
Spring 2013

The Essential Egg

More than a century ago one man’s longing to live in the country led to a course in chicken farming offered through Washington State College, laying the groundwork for one of the largest and oldest egg operations in the Pacific Northwest. Along with just a few other large egg companies, the family-run Wilcox Farms is now a pillar in Washington’s 1.9 billion-egg-a-year industry.

In the early 1900s, a Canadian transplant named Judson Wilcox settled in Seattle. He had a home on Queen Anne and a hat shop in Pioneer Square. But city life wasn’t for him. In 1909 he visited a site east of … » More …

Winter 2012

Onions

Think of all the recipes that begin with this simple instruction: Cook (saute, melt, etc.) onions. In spite of that ubiquitous beginning, however, the literature of food, which can wax poetically and extensively about salt or beans or wine, gives the onion, which provides the savory structure for thousands of dishes, short shrift.

Maybe it is just that onions are so fundamental that we take them for granted, chopping and ingesting them as casually as we breathe air or drink water. Perhaps it is that the onion is a basic and ancient staple, like rice, corn, garlic, its wild ancestors an inherent part of our … » More …

Winter 2012

A place of taste

Chimacum Corner is more than just the busiest intersection in Jefferson County. It’s a yellow-walled farmstand where tomatillos from Finnriver Farm meet Roma tomatoes from SpringRain and where bread from Pane D’Amore bakery can find Cape Cleare tuna or cheese from Mt. Townsend Creamery. And it’s where locals can find the ever-growing bounty of the local farms and fisheries.

The market is just two years old. And with the motto “Eat your food from here” it grew out of a need for the small-scale producers in the region to reach customers outside the farmers’ markets. Rather than one day a week at the farmers’ market … » More …

Fall 2012

Summer Blues

In 1944, when Glenn Aldrich was 12, he helped his father carry blueberry plants into an old sheep pasture next to their home. The family then planted the first commercial blueberries in Lewis County and some of the first in the state.

Maybe it was fate, says Aldrich ’58, ’62, but somehow his father had found the perfect crop for the soft acid soils along the Cowlitz River. The berries flourished there in Mossyrock, a pretty pocket of the valley.

Sixty-eight years later those berry bushes tower over Aldrich. In the intervening years, he has added some 20 more acres, spent time in the Air … » More …

Summer 2012

Recipes: Raspberries

Raspberries can add a tartness and zing to any number of dishes. Try out these recipes from the Washington Red Raspberry Commission, and visit their website for more recipes, health and nutrition information, and storage and cooking tips.

Read about raspberries in the Summer 2012 In Season.

 

Raspberry Frozen Custard

Makes about 1 quart or 8 to 10 servings

Call it frozen custard, call it gelato—by any name this smooth and intensely flavored frozen dessert is fantastic. You can freeze the custard in an old-fashioned ice cream maker using ice and salt, but it’s … » More …

Raspberries. by Cathleen Abers-Kimball
Summer 2012

Raspberries

The cultivation of raspberries is, compared to that of other fruits, a relatively recent endeavor. Rubus idaeus, “the bramble bush of Ida,” purportedly grew on the slopes of Mount Ida and was enjoyed by the residents of the city of Troy. Ida, the nursemaid to the infant Zeus, pricked her finger while picking the originally snow-white berries, staining them red from that time forth. But it was not until the last four or five hundred years, writes D.L. Jennings in his Raspberries and Blackberries, that raspberries have been domesticated.

Today, nearly 60 percent of U.S. red raspberries are produced in Washington. Almost all of the … » More …

A member of the 3 Sisters herd
Spring 2012

How to cook lean beef

Most of us are accustomed to eating beef from cattle finished on grain. The finishing process builds up intramuscular fat and can result in tasty, fat-marbleized meat. But many of Washington’s small and medium-scale cattle ranches finish their cattle on forage and pasture, resulting in a much leaner beef with lower levels of fat and cholesterol. And this leaner meat requires a different approach to cooking.

Here are a few tips from 3 Sisters Cattle Company and the American Grassfed Association to achieving the best results with pasture-fed beef.

Because the meat has less fat, it … » More …

Spring 2012

Recipe: Swiss Chard with Garlicky Chickpeas

It was hard to pick just one recipe from Tender. But given the winter season, the ingredients (chickpeas, chard and garlic) that we’ve recently featured in our magazine, and the smart simplicity of this dish, we chose this one to share.

 

Serves 4 to 6

Garbanzo Beans

1 cup or more garbanzo beans, drained (canned are fine)
5 garlic cloves, peeled
1 sweet onion or 2 large shallots, sliced thin
2 bay leaves
Extra-virgin olive oil to coat

Swiss chard

2 bunches of Swiss chard
2 tablespoons of extra-virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, peeled and … » More …